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to building more nuclear power plants in the u.s. that is up from last year. >>> and now, it is just about that time to head it to the man, the birthday man today, wolf blitzer in "the situation room." wolf, to you. >>> thanks very much, brooke. happening now, two u.s. air force crew members make it out of a fighter jet crash in libya alive. we are taking you to the crash site and telling you how libyan rebels help keep one of them safe. >>> also, president obama is facing growing anger for ordering air strikes in libya without the approval of congress. now, one fellow democrat, even talking about possible impeachment. >>> and new u.s. assessments of the radiation risks from japan's nuclear crisis and new progress inside the plant to shed light on the damage from the sudan. i'm wolf blitzer. you are in "the situation room." >>> some very anxious hours for the u.s. military after the crash of a fighter jet, giving way to relief now that the two crew members are safely out of libya. defense officials confirming that both the pilot and the weapons officer have been rescued. they say the f-15
at the wreckage of a u.s. f-15 that crashed today in rebel-held eastern libya, for reasons the u.s. military says were mechanical, not hostile. i will say that again for you. the u.s. says the plane had equipment problems and was not shot down. the two-man crew jekted and the pilot was recovered quickly. the weapons officer was found by rebels and americans reached him. neither badly hurt. >>> back in tripoli, reporters saw the results of a missile landing on a port. >>> we also have remarkable pictures from misrata, a city down the coast that gadhafi forces have bombarded for days. this is amateur video uploaded to youtube yesterday. now, we can't confirm when or where it was shot, but we do know misrata's main hospital reports 77 deaths since sunday. the u.n.-approved campaign to protect libyan civilians began saturday and it's still not clear who will actually end up in charge. arab states don't want to work for nato and u.s. has other campaigns to worry about. nato says it will enforce a libyan arms embarge go the in meantime. let's bring in diana magnay, she's on the "uss keer sauj." nic rep
plants right here in the united states. >>> and will the u.s. supreme court green light a massive discrimination lawsuit against walmart? arguments today in one of the most important workers' rights cases the court has ever heard. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> moammar gadhafi and his troops are being accused of new carnage and destruction. just hours after president obama tried to explain the u.s. mission in libya to the american people. this hour we have breaking news. we're learning about major, major setbacks for rebel forces in several cities. in misrata, witnesses say government forces are hammering the city hard, firing bullets over civilians' heads and telling them to run for their lives. gadhafi is fighting back with a vengeance against rebels who had regained ground in recent days under the cover of coalition air strikes. >>> and joining us now in ajdabiya is our own arwa damon. you're with the rebels there. how are they doing, arwa? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, wolf, it's been another bitterly disappointing day for the opposition here. th
. we have lots of things in common with the u.s., fast, generous territory, homogeneous people, hardworking people. we don't have racial problems that affect some african countries or the wars that are waged in europe nor the religious conflict of europe itself. and therefore latin america is called to compromise or rather commitment with its own fate. and therefore we are looking forward to president obama's words. we are all left-handed. we have many coincidences. we studied in harvard, both of us. we are sportsmen. president obama continues to be a basketball player. i was in my time as well. i think the first lady of the u.s. is very good-looking, and president obama has said the same thing about the first lady of chile. there are plenty of 0 coincidences. but the most important one is the one we'll find this afternoon, and modestly if i could suggest to president obama, we hope to have a partnership that is two -- one where we have all responsibilities and not existentialism because it's never been enough. rather a partnership of collaboration between latin america and the
congress to continue to be involved. nancy pelosi said u.s. action will be strengthened by consultation with congress. last week a lot of them spoke under the democratic side were critical of president obama for not briefing congress in regards to what the mission was in libya. they feel on the democratic side more aware of what that is and want to be briefed regularly. secretary of state hillary clinton will be beyond with the foreign relations committee. they expect a lot of questions to her, but in terms of setting a precedent for the democratic party to believe in, president obama did accomplish that goal. he did not satisfy republicans at all. one interesting caveat i will say, senator john mccain, the president's opponent actually said he enjoyed hearing president obama clearly state what the policy was in libya. he remained shall we say unaware of how gadhafi would be removeed fr per wldikmo iorti outh, t ppti o what the president's actions were there. john mccain maybe going back to the maverick style by being more supportive of president obama than his conference there. >> the
is preparing his own take on the u.s. role in the war. >>> also this morning, new fears in japan as radiation levels reach stunning new heights, and the air around the damaged nuclear plant is no longer the worry. rather, it's the water. >>> also something we're keeping an eye on right now in great britain. budget cuts are coming at a high cost for british leaders. protesters on the streets this morning clashing with police officers over proposed austerity measures. we'll have the latest from there. again, this is happening right now. from the cnn center, this is your cnn start morning for this march the 26th. i'm t.j. holmes. we do want to start with a new and disturbing incident in tripoli. this happened today. it's a story that maybe highlights the brutality of a regime that so many people are now fighting against. we want to bring in our cnn international correspondent nic robertson with the latest. tell us what happened. >> reporter: well, t.j., it all began this morning over breakfasttime when a lady came into the hotel, a middle aged appeared to be very respectable lady came into the h
a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according to u.s. officials, coalition strikes have successfully crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no-fly zone is effectively in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's tripoli compound last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown. he has vowed to fight a long, drawn out war with western forces. making the rounds on the sunday talk shows, admiral mike mullen stressed that the u.s. role in libya would be limited but he did not give an exact date of how long the u.s. would remain involved. >> there's no one that understands better than i that the stress and the strain that we've been under for a long time in our tenth year of war, both in iraq and in afghanistan. that said, we are within our capability and capacity to be able to execute this mission. the directions have been given to me, it is limited. it is very focused and in that regard, we're more than able, as has been shown
at a major u.s. airport, the very same one where an air traffic controller fell asleep on the job. the close call this time around. >> and she said mexican pirates killed her husband while they were jet skiing on a border lake between texas and mexico. now six months later his body hasn't been found, no one has been arrested. the latest on the investigation, plus what she is vowing to do. it's all new, it's all live, it's "happening now". >>> hi everybody. we have a whole lot of ground to cough today. we're so glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon: we do indeed. i'm jon scott. "happening now", nato takes charge of air operations in libya as the fighting intensifies in one strategic oil town. those are antiqaddafi rebels, giving it all they've got, trying to retake control of brega as they come under rocket fire from pro qaddafi forces, the opposition getting hit hard in other parts of the cup as well. jenna: the u.s. considering a plan to arm the rebels, even though nato's chief is opposed to the idea. right now the cia has operatives on the ground in libya. jon: meantime a sign that qadda
] [inaudible conversations] >>> top officials from the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told senators today that the damaged nuclear power plant in japan, quote come continues to further stabilize, and that there have been no radiation readings in the u.s. the might be of concern. these remarks came before the meeting of the senate energy and natural resources committee. other speakers included officials from the energy department, the nuclear energy institute and the union of concerned scientists. this is an hour and 45 minutes. >> thank you for being here. this is a briefing. this is not a hearing has such. the reason we try to it as a briefing is so that people wouldn't have to file written testimony 72 hours ahead of time and all of that and things are changing very quickly with regard to the evolving situation that the nuclear power plant. will the committee doesn't have direct oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants we do have to consider how events such as those affect the ability of the nation's nuclear fleet of 104 reactors to supply electricity, this of course the 104 react
is a highly developed country. it is as technologically sophisticated as us, and there's much concern in the u.s. that a similar accident can occur here. how do you respond to that concern? >> well, first, i would agree with you. the reactor in chernobyl was of a different design. it was-- it had point of instability. it had no containment vessel. but we are looking very carefully at what is naepg japan because, as you say, they're using more advanced designs. a number of reactors in the united states have similar designs, and we're going to look at what went wrong in terms of the double-barreled whammy this huge, hung earthquake and huge su, and look to our reactors again and learn as much as we can so we can, if needed, improve the safety. by "if needed" what i really mean is we're always increasing the safety of our reactors, and not only our reactors but the safety of all our industrial systems. >> mr. secretary, two days ago a number of us wrote to chairman upton, whitfield, and stearns, asking our committee here investigate and hold hearings about the safety and prepared understandness of
a nationwide review to see if u.s. plants are vulnerable to the same type of earthquake that hit japan. the indian point station is about 25 miles from new york city has two operating nuclear reactors and it sits right on top of the ramapo fault line. the nrc filed a report uncovering a higher safety risk at the plant than previously thought. and that's gotten the attention of new york governor andrew cuomo, a long-time opponent of indian point. >> the world has changed. reevalua reevaluate. reevaluate and look at the situation and decide whether or not you should grant this facility a license today. with what you know today. >> now, we had a chance to speak with officials from energy corp. on our show last week. they say they welcome a safety review. 27 nuclear reactors, including indian point have been singled out for inspections by the nrc. allan chernoff has been granted exclusive access inside the indian point plant and we'll have his report coming up in the next hour of "american morning." >>> another morning of explosions in tripoli and heavy aircraft fire. as of last night, the
then become the largest class action employment suit in u.s. history. walmart, america's largest private employer, says, no, the class would be too big, the plaintiffs too dissimilar, the issues too many to litigate. the plaintiffs say walmart wants a big company exception to civil rights 0 law. two lower federal courts have ruled the class and case can go forward. that brings us to the supreme court where we now have three women justices, the most ever. cnn's kate bolduan has been following the case for us and joins us to recap the arguments. kate, good to see you. any sign that the women justices were at all receptive to the plaintiffs? >> reporter: that's very interesting. i would say, first off, that it did seem in the courtroom with the aggressive question you did hear from the female justices, that they were receptive to the women's claims to the sides of the plaintiffs. but, as i just said, there are three women on this court. so what it's looking like -- we always have to give it a huge caveat here because of course we never know until the justices rule -- from the commentary and
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
decades. >> a massive fire at a u.s. major airport, flames raging for hours, the fallout, plus the investigation into what sparked it. >>> and donald trump with his eye on the presidential prize. does he stand a chance? for real? it's all new, all live, it's french fighter jets take action shooting the libyan war plane out of the sky. jenna: as a new round of strikes hits target necessary tripoli, jet bombers and tom hawkmisms from the coalition target qaddafi air defense. jon: rebel forces making real progress now that qaddafi's tanks have pulled back from key strategic cities, the opposition taking more steps to form a government in the east. rick leventhal is streaming live from benghazi. what can you tell us about qaddafi possibly negotiating an exit plan, rick? >> reporter: well, we heard that libra's more than fr called the u.s. assistant secretary of state over the state -- over the weekend to possibly discuss what qaddafi's exit strategy might be. it's pairnl very preliminary, these calls are made all the time is what we're hearing but there may have been a call made fr
, click on it. suddenly large crowds were denouncing their president hosni mubarak. the u.s. was in the awkward position of supporting the pro-democracy demonstrators without alienating a longtime ally. after weeks of bloody confrontations and a tense vigil in tahrir square longtime president mubarak abruptly stepped down. now we go to libya. right here in the middle again. click on it. gives you all the latest developments and everything you need to know. libya has become the focal of this historic movement. rebels swept into dozens of key cities until moammar gadhafi unleashed military forces on his own people and that prompted nato to get involved leveling the field with strategic air strikes. this fever has now spread to syria. again, all of the information on cnn.com. bahrain, of course, on the map here and also in yemen, as well. anything can happen. john? >> and, don, two really important questions coming out of all of this. what's going to happen next, and why is this happening? mohammed jamjoon is live in our bureau there in abu dhabi to answer some of these questio
. >> of the united nations representative for afghanistan said the u.s.-led surge in the country is working. he spoke and the middle east institute in washington as the u.s. voted to extend its mission by one year. this is 55 minutes. >> he has come from new york where he was talking about afghanistan. i believe the security council is voting today. is that correct? on thursday, he was talking about the u.s. role in afghanistan and its camilla -- commitment to the development of the country. the u.n. plays an important role. there are 34 representatives in afghan provinces. they spent over $1 billion on the country last year. food programs, health services, and infrastructure and development. the afghans are asking to take a greater lead in all aspects of government and development and the efforts to achieve peace. staffan de mistura made it clear that the u.n. takes these calls for sovereignty. seriously. what are the challenges of handing over greater responsibility to the afghan government? how can the u.n. support the process and maintain its commitment to the development of afghanistan? these qu
upper level winds that actually transport that into parts of kansas, the u.s., and many other places. and before all is said and done, i would not be surprised if you could find trace amounts of this all the way over to europe. but i have to tell you, this is very, very harmless. this is not a big deal. if you're walking out to your car in bright sunlight, chances are you might be exposed to more radiation than that than these particles across the globe. >> it does still, of course, make you think twice when you hear about it. but hearing it's harmless is good. >>> in a few minutes, we'll be talking more about all of this with a disaster expert about containment efforts in japan. he led numerous expeditions into some of the most contaminated areas of chernobyl. >>> to libya now, and rebels getting closer to moammar gadhafi's doorstep gaining ground with new coalition air strikes. nato now says it will take over the entire military mission there, not just the no-fly zone. so far the u.s. has supplied nearly all the fire power according to pentagon figures. the u.s. military has launch
minister resigns. jenna: also new developments in yemen, a key u.s. ally and central battleground against al-qaida, antigovernment demonstrators pouring into a square in the city's capitol calling for an end to the regime and they may just get it. the president there announcing today he will step down on certain conditions. reenaninan is live in jerusalem with more. >> reporter: you know, what we are seeing now just in the past few hours for the very first time the leaders of syria and yemen have decided to send out their own progovernment protestors to match the antigovernment protesters in the street, that's something that hasn't happened yet in the back and forth. in yemen the president announced that he's willing to hand over the reigns of power there but it has to be to someone he approves of. he claims he doesn't want to see his country descend into civil war and he announced that to his supporters today. he has been ruling yemen for more than 30 years, but still thousands of antigovernment protesters continue to take to the streets to defy the government and call for him to resign
. is the threat to the u.s. and the world growing? murderous attacksing libyan forces answer president obama's address with a new round of attacks on civilians, according to the rebels. >>> and camelot, it's not. the new miniseries on jfk and jackie o., many historians say it's more fiction than fact. we speak to the producer 0 of the series ahead. >>> good afternoon. we begin with the disaster in japan where the prime minister says the country is in a stalts of maximum alert, this as the fukushima crisis worsens. japan officials have said they believe there's been a partial meltdown at three of the plants' six reactors, that's half. now today radioactive water has been discovered in the maintenance tunnel at the plant. in a a spatefrtepha fr l io ocns e nd ncte peltoeer he nnoced 2 etrothor nd, stonrm plonm seepifr the damaged nuclear power plant into the soil outside the facility. plutonium is years. but so far, officials claim the levels found are not harmful to human health. meanwhile, more traces of radiation have been found in the u.s., raising new concerns. today in california one of
understanding, as well. and how many did we drop? >> 200. >> this hour, susan rice, u.s. ambassador to the united nations, senator joe lieberman. plus, nearly 30 years to the day since white house press secretary james brady was shot during assassination attempt on president ronald reagan. gun control advocates, jim and sarah brady are here for a rare live interview. >> caught fire. shot fire. >> followup, rawhide is okay? good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. president obama says that the u.s. has done its job in libya and is reallyf trade hand over control to nato but tell take longer than he has said. nbc news has learned today that the handover will not be tomorrow, more likely toward the end of the week. meanwhile, secretary of state hillary clinton is at a libya summit in london today. this morning, she met with an envoy to discuss the next steps. >> we cannot and must not attempt to impose our will on the people of libya, but we can and must stand with them as they determine their own destiny. >> today, a top nato commander said that international pressure will li
to libya, gene cretz talking to the opposition chief. >> >> a u.s. officials confirmed the authenticity of the call, but would not comment on the query about weapons. hillary clinton is speaking to the opposition, too. >> we are reaching out to the opposition inside and outside of libya. i will be meeting with some of those figures both here in the united states and when i travel next week to discuss what more the united states and others can do. >> reporter: but moammar gadhafi and is spokesman's son show no signs of caving into pressure. >> the libyan peet will never, ever welcome nato, will never, ever welcome americans here. libya is not a piece of cake. we are n-- >> this is a kind of stalemate back and forth, but i think longer term, that the regime will prevail. >> jill dougherty reporting for us from the state department. we'll have a lot more on what general clapper, head of the national -- director of national intelligence had to say. this note, though, i have been invited to travel with secretary clinton on her overseas trip next week. i'll be reporting on critical talks abou
the u.s. in was cans. in the '90s, she ran for u.s. senate in new york twice and lost in the democratic primaries. >> in december of 1998, i was diagnosed with a blood cancer, multiple myeloma. >> she revealed she had a form of blood cancer and became a tireless advocate raise awareness into her disease, refusing to give into cancer, she worked on hillary clinton's failed presidential bid in 2008 and shoo voluntarily resigned after being accused of making alleged remarks to a newspaper about then-candidate brama, who she -- barack obama, who she said would not have been successful if he was white or a woman. she was not a racist but she was upset. >> i feel very bad for people who, who thought was a racist. i really do and this has been the worst three weeks of my life. >> reporter: when sarah palin was chosen as mccain's running mate, she said it was wonderful to see a woman on the national ticket, noting she didn't want to be the only one. two years later, they met in person on election night in 2010. in the role that political analyst for fox news. >> and that opportunity that i and
in on our own. we should be going in under the u.n., not the u.s. flag. we shouldn't attack a country this didn't attack us first and shouldn't have boots on the ground. from that mouth, this is sort of the perfect way to go. we go in not under the u.s. flag but under the u.n. flag. we go in on the humanitarian mission, short-term limited thing, no boots on the ground. i think that going in, he did it the right way. my big question is how long are we going to be there? what really is our mission? i think the -- it is really, really fuzzy whether it is just to protect the rebels or to get gadhafi out. we are saying both things. how much is it going to cost? it depends on how soon we get out. if we could turn this over to the french government or to somebody else, as they say they are going to, in a couple of days, get out of there, then i think this is going to be a successful operation. if it drags on and gadhafi stays in power, it is another loser. >> pat buchanan, what are the odds if we are being realistic we will be out as the president had said in a mere matter of days, turning i
and 19 miles to evacuate. you remember the u.s. evacuation zone is 50 miles away from the fukushima plant. now they are expanding it to get closer to where we are on this. so far the evacuation is voluntary, it could become mandatory if the conditions get worse. as we mentioned at the top of this hour there are fears that there could be a genuine breach in one of those nuclear reactors. as soon as we get more on that we will bring it right to you. and this week america's top prosecutor attorney general eric holder met with police chiefs to discuss the rising danger to police across this country. according to the latest statistics 50 enforcement officers were killed in the line of duty through march 24th of this year. that come mayor with 45 in the same period of 2010. this has been on the rise. there is a new push to protect those who work so hard and put their lives on the line to protect us. doug mckelway is live with more on this. good afternoon, doug. >> reporter: good afternoon, martha. what is most disturbing about that it is occurring at a time when violent crime and murder is gene
, can you elaborate? >> i have had the privilege in this job a traveling to half of the u.s. attorney's offices across the country. as part of our visits to make sure that we are aggressively enforcing civil rights laws and listening, we are listening and learning as i did in chicago from. sticklers north dakota muslim sheik is on committee. it really tears my heart out to listen to this story. i will never forget a trip to tennessee where and iman talks about how his son does not want to go to school because he is so scared every day. they were telling him, go home, you terrorist. this is his own. we see this across the country. we see this in a wide array of areas, employment, religious zoning context, school context. >> according to data from the equal opportunity employment commission, muslims of 0.45% of religious discrimination cases. those i mentioned earlier comprise less than 1% of the population. "there is a level of hatred and animosity that is shocking. i have been doing this for 31 years, i have never seen such an to pass the toward workers." among other things, the suit
to ge get rid of him and the opposition needs continued military support, not a ground invasion by the u.s. or any other western power, but air support, all the way to tripoli, very few people want to die for gadhafi, so if we'll continue the model we have in place, following the rebels, knocking out tank and arrest tiltillerar will win and a lot of people will die unnecessarily. >> you have criticized president obama for taking too long. he made the point that he took 31 days to build this coalition where in bosnia it took a year. >> the opposition forced had gadhafi on the ropes and we did not impose a no fly zone where it would matter the most. we made mistakes in iraq, and to my fellow republican friends, nobody complained about the cost of iraq or afghanistan on our watch. i'm tired of hearing people talk about it cost too much. let me tell you about what it will cost if gadhafi comes back into power, instability forever, incredible oil price spikes. young people throughout the arab world thinking we let them down at a time we could help them. so the balance sheet of keeping him versu
.p.a. regs hanging over their head. the regulatory flexibility act. shaded areas indicate u.s. you is session. the 2009 research -- that's the word i can't read, organizations. look at how this is. this is what's happening from regulations. it's going up. on the unemployment scale. the r.e.f. requires the federal agencies to assess the economic impact on small business, we talked about that. to come up with alternatives because unemployment rates are around or above 9% for the past 22 months, it's time that we make these regulations be assessed and seven out of 10 of the new jobs are created by these small businesses. when you hear us talk about the pesticide act, it's very clear, there's the folks that are dealing with it right there. the farmers of america. and it's duplicative. that means they already have a permit that allows them to put out these pesticides and because of this ruling they're having to make -- get another permit at another cost and meet other guidelines for these pesticides. the sixth circuit, we think with this, made a bad ruling and these higher costs to producers and c
contacts or other u.s. officials' contacts with the opposition since the -- that first meeting in paris between the secretary and mr. jabril. and tell us if you are at all closer to making a decision on whether to follow the lead that france so helpfully started out a couple weeks and recognizing them a legitimate government. >> since the start of the crisis, when we saw that the council had constituted itself as some kind of temporary governing body, i and certainly members of my staff recognized that some of those people were people that we had dealt with during our tenures in libya. and so right from the start, i had been reaching out to the leaders of the council. and since that time, since the embassy was reconstituted here as i said, we had extensive dealings and contacts through our various programs, especially educational programs, with the people of the east. i had a very active public affairs section in libya, and they were always communicating with the -- with the doctors and jurists and people who, in fact, now are part of the council. so we had a good in to those people. si
assault, assistance from the u.s. and other air forces. i am against it. i think, again, if the french and other allies feel they have a strategic interest in taking this battle on behalf of opposition all the way to tripoli, then let them land of the foreign legion in tripoli and let them take on this fight. this is what the french government wants. they have a greater stake in the outcome than we do come and they do not think the united states has a core strategic interests getting involved any more than the military has done so, despite the clamoring of the opposition. this is something that is really of no great consequence to the united states, and that our allies want to take on the responsibility for this fight, we should let them do so. host: let's conclude with this question. what do you think will happen in libya, and if or when he leaves, who is his successor? guest: unless he continues to get hammered by other air forces, other than ourselves, he will continue to hold on. there is some hope on the part of the secretary of defense gates that there would be divisions within h
equipment. some of their equipment dates back to world war ii. are you ruling out u.s. military hardware assistance? >> i'm not ruling it out. but i'm also not ruling it. in we're not taking anything off the table at this point. our primary military goal is to protect civilian populations and to set up the no-fly zone. our primary strategic goal is for gadhafi to step down so that the libyan people have an opportunity to live a decent life. >> not ruling it out but not ruling it in. obama also insisted that western air strikes until now have done a great deal to weaken gadhafi. >> our role is to provide support, intelligence, jamming capabilities, refueling capabilities, and so we have been able to spread the burdens of maintaining a no-fly zone and protecting civilian populations, and we can do that for quite some time. precisely because we built a strong coalition to make it happen. but gadhafi's been greatly weakened. he does not have control over most of libya at this point. so for us to continue to apply this pressure i think will allow us the space and the time to forge the kind of
100 people. only one aircraft was down oed in that particular attack, one u.s. aircraft, and that's always been the symbol, that sculpture that you're seeing on the scene. and so clearly some p.r. work to use that as the picture, if you like, for moammar gadhafi's statement, assuming it is moammar gadhafi. aggressors, animals, criminals, tyrants, all tyrants fall under the pressure of the masses. those are the words, pretty much everything that we have heard on previous occasions in what sounds to be like it's going to be quite a long speech by moammar gadhafi. but he does say the people have been given weapons, all people have been given weapons, this will be hell, he says, and he called upon his own people to take part in what he's calling against the aggressives the new crusaders war. he then talks about how they will -- that the aggressors, referring to, of course, the allied forces, will not enjoy oil, we will continue to fight. that's moammar gadhafi, we believe, speaking. we be will back in just a moment. this is cnn. it takes knowing we have our work cut out for us. flying
of the u.s. debate in part of the transfers to the transitional council? >> we haven't made a decision about arming the rebels or arms transfers, so there has not been any need to discuss that at this point. we did discuss nonlethal assistance and discussed ways of trying to enable the transition national council to meet a lot of their financial needs and how we could do that through the international community, given the challenges that sanctions pose, but recognizing they obviously are going to need funds to keep themselves going. we discussed a broad range of matters and certainly their presentation, which some of you may have seen earlier today as to what kind of civil society and political structure they are trying to build until libya, are exactly in line with what they have consistently said were their goals, their commitment to democracy and to a very robust engagement with people from across the spectrum of libyans is, i think, appropriate. we do not have any specific information about specific individuals from any organization who are part of this, but, of course, we are gett
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